Transmax Trans-Resveratrol – Back in Stock!

trans-resveratrol_Transmax By Ali Wetherbee

Resveratrol: The Fountain of Youth

Resveratrol is an polyphenol found in foods such as red wine, cocoa, red grapes, berries, and peanuts. Research suggests that resveratrol activates the expression of the SIRT1 (Sirtuin 1) gene, the longevity gene, which prevents disease by speeding up mitochondria and kicking cells into a “survival mode” similar to that induced by calorie restricted diets, which are known to extend lifespan. “In the history of pharmaceuticals,” says Harvard Medical School genetics professor David Sinclair, “There has never been a drug that binds to a protein to make it run faster in the way that resveratrol activates SIRT1.” SIRT1 also activates the ADAM10 (alpha-secretase) protein, which reverses damage to brain neurons. Lab studies have found resveratrol to extend the lifespan of mice, yeast, worms, fruit flies, and fish. Resveratrol also possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and tumor inhibitory effects, and may help the body overcome the effects of high-calorie diets, obesity, and normal aging. It reduces inflammation, protects against free radical damage, suppresses LDL (“bad”) cholesterol, lowers the risk of blood clots, and prevents insulin resistance. It may also be able to trigger cancer cell death. Studies indicate that resveratrol may prevent numerous diseases associated with aging, including cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer’s, diabetes, and certain cancers.

Why is trans-resveratrol superior?

There are two forms of resveratrol, trans-resveratrol and cis-resveratrol. The benefits of resveratrol derive almost exclusively from the trans-resveratrol isomer. When a study, news report, or article talks about health benefits of resveratrol, they are actually talking specifically about trans-resveratrol. Cis-resveratrol is not as readily absorbed by the body, and is rather unstable. Some literature even suggest that cis-resveratrol may negate the benefits of trans-resveratrol.

Can’t I just drink more red wine?

Yes, but you would get drunk trying to consume significant amounts of resveratrol! A 5-ounce glass of red wine has between .3 and 1.07 mg of resveratrol. The range for other foods — a cup of boiled peanuts, or one cup of red grapes — is similar, rarely exceeding 1.5mg per serving for any food or drink. A supplement can provide many times that amount, between to 200-500mg of resveratrol. Recent studies have found no adverse effects for doses up to 5 grams (5000mg).

What to look for in a resveratrol supplement

Products with at least 98% resveratrol are purer and more potent. Products with 50% resveratrol generally cost less, but you’ll need to take twice as much to obtain the same dose as a product with 98-99% resveratrol. Many products that contain around 50% resveratrol have as high as 10% emodin. Emodin has a strong laxative effect and can cause loose stools, upset stomach, gas, and pain or discomfort. Products with 98% resveratrol have less than 1% emodin, which is not enough to cause any digestive distress. If you opt for a product with closer to 50% emodin, be sure it contains less than 2% emodin. If your product is not labeled with the amount of trans-resveratrol, it could contain very little or none, thus rendering it completely useless.

Biotivia TransMax – Back in stock!

BTTransmax60

  • 500mg of 98% Pure Trans-Resveratrol
  • Very low in emodin (less than 1%)
  • Contains no additives or fillers
  • GMO free
  • Free of chemicals and synthetics
  • Derived from all natural wild Polygonum cuspidatum (Japanese knotweed)
  • Packed in an oxygen & UV free sterile environment to avoid destructive oxidation
  • Manufactured in CGMP and SFDA certified facilities

Perfect ResGrape

PSResGrape_MED

  • 200mg of 99% Pure Trans-Resveratrol
  • 1000mg of antioxidant rich, whole food Muscadine grapes
  • No emodin
  • Free of chemicals and synthetics
  • Contains no additives or fillers
  • Wild-crafted resveratrol
  • Organic, pesticide-free Muscadine Grapes
  • Purity tested and verified by an independent lab

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